Thursday, February 11, 2010

Moog Interface newsletter, Vol. 1 Sept. 1980





Moog Interface newsletter, Vol. 1 Sept. 1980.

I've been scanning some newsletters slowly over time so I could draw on them when I'm having a busy time at work. And, it is perfect timing since I recently saw a flurry of activity when a few of these went up on eBay.

This is a fabulous newsletter - from the font used for 'Interface' to the paper it is printed on. But, content is king, and this newsletter contains some great stuff. Here's my top 10 list:

10. Liberation 'action' shot on the front page
9. Describes Moog's process of pre-aging integrated circuit boards in ovens as weeding out "infant mortality"
8. Chick Corea's hair
7. Pushin' synths on school children - "for the cost of a sax, you can own a Micromoog"
6. Font used for 'Interface'
5. Photo of Marty Jourard from The Motels.
4. You can tour their Buffalo factory
3. The Los Angeles Times cartoon - "Thank you. But 'our song' needs a Moog synthesizer. MINE REALLY DOES!
2. Photo of Devo on the set of their 'Girl U Want' video
1. Contest to win a Moog Satin Flight Jacket

While writing that top 10, I did a quick comparison to the ARP newsletter I blogged about late last year. The first thing I noticed was that both are strictly a black and white print job on a thicker stock paper. Start reading, and you find very similar content too, including Q&A sections, news and photos of famous users (name droppin'!), and a splash of technical info.

But, not sure if that is a fair comparison - a 1980 Moog newsletter to a 1974 ARP newsletter.

So, I decided to pull out an ARP newsletter from June 1980 and see how they stacked up. I don't want to give too much away, since I'll be posting that ARP newsletter in the near future, but one thing did make me a little jealous for the '80s... both newsletters are giving away flashy SATIN JACKETS!

I may have to sport my flashy satin jacket at work tomorrow!

1 comment:

zenbecca said...

8(b). Chick Corea's 'stache.

Were satin jackets really worth $100 in 1980??

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